From: The South Carolina Gazette, 15 January 1785, Page 2, Column 1

PHILADELPHIA, DECEMBER 21

The following are authentic extracts from the ancient records of New-Haven colony before it was incorporated with Connecticut.

At a General Court, held at New-Haven, the 11th of February, 1640
It was ordered, that commodities well bought in England, for ready money, shall not be sold here above three-pence in the shilling for profit, and adventure, above what they cost with charges, when sold by retail; when sold by the piece or vessel by wholesale, less profit may suffice; when bought from ships or other vessels here not above three-pence in the shilling by retail, nor above a penny by wholesale. But commodities of a perishable nature, subject to waste and damage, shall not be under the former rates; yet the rates to be so ordered, that neither buyer nor seller suffer in the rates.

August 5th, 1640.
Goodman Osborn, fined five shillings, for neglecting to warn the watch-master next succeeding his own, whereby the watch was neglected three nights.

1st of the 7th month, 1640.
It is ordered, that at this day every year, all the ram goats in this town, shall either be side-stringed, or some other course taken with them, so that they cannot ram the ewes until the fittest season.

23d of the 8th month.
It is granted to the two deacons to choose where they shall have their farms as near as may be able to the town, that they may better attend their office.

January 5th, 1641.
Thomas Badger, being accused and convicted for defiling himself with diver unclean passages with one of his master's children, not above six years of age, was whipped at the cart's arse, about the town, to make his punishment exemplary.

The 6th of the 2d month, 1642.
It is ordered, that no young men shall live by themselves in cellars, but betake themselves to such families as the matter thereof may not only watch over them, but be able to give an account of or concerning their conversation when required.

The 1st day of the 6th Month, 1642.
Samuel Hoskins and Elisabeth, for their filthy dalliance (modern kissing and toying) together, which was confessed by them both, they were both severely whipped.

September 7th, 1642
Samuel Hoskins and Elizabeth Cleverly, being desirous to join together in a state of marriage, and not being able to make proof of their parents consent; but feeling they both affirm they have the consent of their parents; and withal their having entered into contract, sinfully and wickedly defiling each other with filthy dalliance and unclean passages, by which they have both made themselves unfit for others, and for which they have both received public correction, upon these considerations granted them liberty to marry.

At a court held at New Haven on the 4th of the 11th month, 1642
William Harding, being convicted of a great deal of base carriage and filthy dalliances with divers young girls, together with his inticing and corrupting divers servants in this plantation, haunting with them in mee[?]ing and junketing, he is sentenced to be severely whipped, fined five pounds to Malborn, and five pounds to Mr. William Andrus, (whose families and daughters he had so much dishonored and wronged, in attempting to defile them) and presently to depart the plantation, and not to return under penalty of severer punishment.

At a court held at New Haven, the 1st of the 1st month, 1643.
John Laurens and Valentine, servants to Mr. Malborn, for embezzling their master's goods and keeping disorderly night meetings with William Harding, a lewd and disorderly person, plotting with him to carry his master's daughters to the farms in the night, conceling divers unclean, filthy dalliances, all which they confessed and were whipped.

Ruth A[?]es, a convenant servant to Mr. Malborn, for stubborness, lying and stealing from her mistress, and yielding to filthy dalliance with William Harding was whipped--Jane Andres for yielding to filthy dalliance with said Harding, was whipped.

Goodman Hunt and his wife, for keeping the counsels of the said Harding, baking him a pastry and plumb cakes, and keeping company with him on the Lord's day, and the suffering Harding to kiss her, they being only admitted to sojourn in this plantation upon their good behavior, were ordered to be sent out of town within one month of the date hereof, yes, in a shorter time, if any miscarriage be found in them.

Margaret Bedforde, being convicted of fornication and stealing, with divers other miscarriages, was severely whipped, and as a severer punishment, was ordered to be married to Nicholas Gennings.

It was ordered in court November 13th, 1646, That every family within this plantation, shall have a coat made of cotton-wool, well and substantially made, so as it may be fit for service, and that in conveniant time the taylors see it done.

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